Health Wonk Review – Rich and Varied Offerings

Joe Paduda has hosted the newest edition of Health Wonk Review, a bi-weekly roundup of some of the best healthcare posts in the blogosphere. You will find it at Joe’s blog,  Managed Care Matters.:

Here are just a few highlights:

  • Over at HealthBusinessBlog David E Williams  responds to a relative’s question : Why are Obamacare’s opponents so vehement?The bottom line, says David, is that “some opponents have whipped themselves into a lather over their revulsion to all things Obama and are living in an echo chamber where these views seem rational. It would be better for everyone if they went back to the Birther madness.”

    I agree. This is not about healthcare, and it is not about money. The Congressional Budget Office has told us that the ACA will not add to the deficit..  As David points out many of the ideas in the Affordable Care Act were originally Republican ideas. It is not a radical plan for health care reform; it is a moderate plan. And Obama himself is a moderate. Why then do they hate him with such a passion? I’ll leave it to you to answer that question.

  • In a post titledWe’re all in this together” Louise Norris confides that under the Affordable Care Act, her family’s insurance premiums will rise sharply. (They had a high deductible plan with low premiums. The ACA outlaws such high deductibles because in too many cases, insurers sell them to low-income and lower-middle income families who then cannot afford to use them. So they put off getting healthcare until they are very, very sick.)Meanwhile, Louise and her husband earn too much to qualify for premiums. But they’re not angry. “We support [reform]” she explains, “because something like this isn’t supposed to be all about us. In the case of healthcare reform, our higher premiums will help ensure that our friends and neighbors and fellow citizens have access to affordable health insurance.”  Joe writes: “Thanks for the reminder, Louise!” I agree wholeheartedly. (btw Louise is a health insurance broker.)

 

 

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Health Wonk Review –Waste, Warnings and the Future

 

Last week I hosted Health Wonk Review for HIO.  This round-up of some of the health care posts published over the past two weeks includes:

–  A piece by Managed Care Matter’s Joe Paduda that takes a hard look at “Flu season and Tamiflu,” and asks “Which one’s more hyped?”

 – A investigative post on Health Care Renewal that reviews “The Tragic Case of Aaron Swartz,”  the young computer activist who faced criminal charges for downloading thousands of scientific scholarly articles from the site JSTOR. After being pursued by a “tough as nails, relentless federal prosecutor,” Swartz committed suicide. Yet blogger Roy Poses notes, this same U.S. Attorney has been “soft as a marshmallow when dealing with top executives of health care corporations.”

– A post by The Hospitalist Leader’s Brad Flansbaum questioning the ACA’s assumption that a high rate of hospital readmissions signals waste. Just how many were preventable?

 –  In  a provocative post on Health Business Blog, David E. Williams asks why Cincinnati hospitals are furious because some employers have signed up for an insurance plan that would pay all hospitals just 40% more than Medicare pays for the same service.  The Hospitals claim  that isn’t enough. Moreover, each hospital would like to set its own prices—quietly. (This allows brand-name hospitals to charge far more than some of their competitors, for exactly the same services. )

 – On Wright on Health, Brad Wright describes a new rule, proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services that could prove “disastrous” for patients on Medicaid: “HHS is now attempting to woo states into participating in the Medicaid expansion by allowing them to increase cost-sharing in Medicaid” for all but the poorest of the poor. (More bloggers and reporters might want to write about this. The proposed rule will be open for comment until Feb. 13.)

 

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