Breast Cancer: Catching Up With Amy Berman, a Woman Who Chose Life Over Longevity

HealthBeat readers may remember the two-part post that I wrote about Amy Berman back in October of 2011.

Part 1 began:  “When Amy Berman was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer a year ago, she made a courageous choice. Instead of fleeing death, she decided to pursue life.  Rejecting chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, she chose palliative care instead.” 

                                   Our War on Cancer

Berman knew that her stage IV cancer could not be cured. As a nurse, she also knew what women who undergo aggressive treatment endure—and that, despite that treatment, many will never escape the disease.

As Clifton Leaf points out in his new book The Truth in Small Doses, when people talk about the strides that we have has  made in our War On Cancer, they greatly exaggerate our success. When it comes to breast cancer, for example, 30 years after we launched the way, the number of women per 100,000 who die of breast cancer had actually grown from 28.4 per 100,000 in 1970 to 29.2 per 100,000 in 2000.

Over the next 10 years, the death rate fell to 26.2 per 100,000 women. But we know that this was mainly because we have gotten better at detecting breast cancer early, when the tumors are small and easily removed.  By contrast, most of the caustic drugs designed to defeat cancer have disappointed.

Of  “the myriad compounds that have set the research community abuzz, the ones that have already built up billions of sales,” Leaf observes, “there is little evidence” that “they have had more than a modest effect on long-term patient outcomes. Taken together, this multitude of drugs has been responsible for about a quarter of the reduction seen in the standardized death rate.”

Granted five-year-survival rates have improved. But this, too, is largely because we are diagnosing cancer earlier.  In the past, if the disease was detected when a woman was 65 and she died at 67, we would say she died of cancer. Today, if a tumor is detected when she is 62, and she lives a few months past 67, she has made it to the five-year mark and is counted as a “survivor.”  Thus Elizabeth Edwards’ name was added to the roll of victories–even though breast cancer killed her.

By measuring our progress in terms of five-year-survival rates we “transform nearly six hundred thousand annual deaths into a victory-in progress,” Leaf notes. This allows us to hide from what he calls “an unshakable reality: the rising toll from cancer is plain to see, but this method of counting is so firmly established and so commonly used by health care researchers and policymakers, that few remember anymore that it’s a statistical sleight of hand.”

Even If She Could Not Be Cured, Why Didn’t Berman Try to Buy More Time?

After she was diagnosed, Berman secured an appointment a pre-eminent researcher/clinician in the field of inflammatory breast cancer.

He was clear about what she should do: Chemo, radiation and a mastectomy, followed by more chemo. This he told her, is “what I recommend for all of my patients.”

In part 2 of my 2011 post, I quoted her memory of that conversation:

“I pressed him, ‘Why do the mastectomy?’ I asked, puzzled. ‘The cancer has already spread to my spine. You can’t remove it.’

“His brow furrowed: ‘Well, you don’t want to look at the cancer, do you?’

“He made it sound like cosmetic surgery,” she recalled. “Considering that a total mastectomy includes months of pain and rehabilitation, I thought that worrying about the view was secondary.”

She continued to press him.

“But what about the side effects of radiation?’ I asked. ‘I’ve heard they are terrible’.

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The facts behind the controversy over breast feeding

The following post originally appeared on the healthinsurance.org blog.

First, a purposefully salacious TIME cover featuring a mother nursing her three-year-old stirred controversy. Then a photo of Air Force moms breastfeeding while in uniform sparked outrage.

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Breast Cancer – Living with the Disease, Part 2

“The Best Care America Has To Offer”

Below, Amy Berman describes her recent journey through our health care system as “eye-opening.”  In part 1 of this post, she explained why she decided on palliative treatment for breast cancer, rejecting aggressive procedures such as mastectomy and chemo.

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